IDJC Shoutcast setup guide

IDJC – Internet DJ Console….. It uses Jack…. This thing had me stumped for the longest time…. I just couldn’t seem to get it to work… I do however now use it all the time. So a simple guide to those who needs to use it. Written for Ubuntu of course.

First of all we need Jack. Open a terminal and enter :

sudo apt-get install jackd qjackctl

Open Limits.conf

sudo gedit /etc/security/limits.conf

Add the following lines into the file :

@audio - rtprio 99
@audio - memlock unlimited
@audio - nice -19

Save and close.

Now open System > Administration > Users and Groups

Click the keys where it says click to make changes, put in your password. Click Manage groups. You should find one called audio, if not, add group and call it audio. Add yourself to it.

Log out and in again.

Run Jack, you should find it in Sound and Video.

Click Setup. Below is a couple of pictures of my set up screens. Mimic them, if it doesnt work, you can tweak them.

Screenshot-Setup - JACK Audio Connection Kit

Ok few things in this window.

Realtime – Some people find its better to have it turned off, some people cant get it to work at all with this ticked.

Frames/Peroid – I have this down to 256. My partner has it at 1024. My friend has it a 2048. Youll have to play with this a bit.

Interface – This is where it takes the sound from. If you have a funny sound set up, multiple sound cards, usb sound devices, you may need to tweak this.

Screenshot-Setup - JACK Audio Connection Kit-1

Should work for everyone.

Screenshot

Should work for everyone.

Screenshot-1

Personal preferences. But this is my set up.

Ok, we have Jack set up, Wewt wewt! Now for IDJC. Open a terminal and give it a :

sudo apt-get install idjc

If you want Shoutcast aswell Icecast give one of these aswell :

sudo apt-get install libmp3lame0 libmp3lame0-dev

If you dont install these Shoutcast will be greyed out in the options. Now open Internet > IDJC

Click Server, drag the boxes bottom corner and expand it out, i mean right out! Theres a lot of options and stuff here but every time i set this up it opens as a tiny little window.

This is how i have mine set up. Password poofed of course.

Screenshot-2

Once its all filled in hit Server Connect. Should start streaming straight away. Simply drag songs out of nautilus into playlist 1 and hit play. You can make a playlist in Rythmbox, highlight the whole playlist and drag it into playlist 1. Means you can pre make them, save them, use them later etc. Press the big mic button in the bottom right corner to talk. I pause the music as the song ends and do my talking but i guess thats DJ dependant.

Anywhos, thous a IDJC shoutcast guide.

Linux Bookmark project (part 6)

Ok, started adding in more bookmarks this weekend. Still haven’t started doing the blogs yet annoyingly. Anywhos, ive added in all the photography and artwork in Linux links that are on this blog. Links to guides for Blender, Inkscape, Gimp and photography applications.

Link to art guides page

Link to photography applications

All the links on them pages have been bookmarked under their respective headings, and will be combined and uploaded later today.

For those that havent heard of the Linux bookmark project yet, heres a link : Linky

Installing XFCE4 4.6 on Xubuntu

(updated, new repo for XFCE 4.6, see here)

Ok, ive noticed theres a lot of google searches for my page popping up looking for install guides on how to install the new XFCE Desktop. So here is a quick guide. I ran this on Xubuntu Intrepid 8.10 without a hitch.

Right click this link and save it:

http://www.tx-us.xfce.org/archive/xfce-4.6.0/installers/xfce4-4.6-installer.run

Ok, next we need to install a few things. Open terminal and enter the following :

sudo apt-get install libgtk2.0-dev libice-dev libsm-dev libxpm-dev

Now navigate to the XFCE file you downloaded in terminal. I saved mine to my desktop, if you did too, just copy paste the following command.

cd Desktop

Now we change it into an executable file and run it. Copy paste these into your terminal.

chmod +x xfce4-4.6-installer.run
./xfce4-4.6-installer.run

You will then be presented with a nice GUI to lead you the rest of the way.

I installed this on a vary sparse Xubuntu on a testing partition. I had a minor problem with a mix of 4.4 and 4.6 but nothing major. However, i have seen people running this and running into worse problems with 4.4 and 4.6 mixing. If your unsure and dont knot know what your doing, wait for it to come up in the repos. Jauntys not far away now and it will be in Jaunty.

Hope this helps someone

Linux Shoutcast Guide (Part 3 – Playlists)

Last part of my guide, the play lists. You can call the play lists whatever you like, for this we are going to the example.lst. Personally I have 30+ play lists ready for whenever I need them. Whenever you want to play a different play list, open the conf file, and change the name of the play list. For example:

PlaylistFile=example.lst
PlaylistFile=chillout.lst
PlaylistFile=ministry_vs_hedkandi.lst

Ok, so on to making a play list. Open example.lst. When you run Shoutcast it will play what ever is in this file in order of this file. If you do not have shuffle turned on it will play in order of The 2 lines are just examples. Delete them both (and the rest of the text if you like, its not needed) and enter the paths to the songs you want to play. An example is below for a four song play list.

/home/nai/Shoutcast/sc_trans_040/3 minutes.mp3
/home/nai/Music/Aaliyah/Aaliyah/15 - Try Again.mp3
/home/nai/Music/Chill Carrier - Awakening/01 - Beautiful Flow.mp3
/home/nai/Music/Darude/Sandstorm/01 - Sandstorm (radio edit).mp3

In Ubuntu, you can browse for the files in Nautilus, right click and copy them, then paste them into the text file. That will just paste the path into the file. Makes life a little easier if you like using the file manager.

Some things to bear in mind. Now for some odd reason, it has always played from the 2nd track for me. So put your first song into the 2nd line.

Also, the play list keeps repeating itself when done. This can be a pain in the bum if you want a nice smooth ending to your play list. So to counter this, bearing in mind the first time your play list skips the first track, I have a 3 minute long silent track at the start of the play list. This gives me a nice long silence where I can kill Shoutcast. I Kill the process to stop it playing. You can do this through terminal with the KILL command. Personally I keep Ubuntu’s process monitor open in a small window in the bottom of my screen. Once the play list is done, I right click it and kill it.

Now thats it. Once you have finished your play list make sure the play lists name is in your .conf file correctly. Now start the sc_trans_linux program and it will begin playing your play list.

That’s it! Your now broadcasting Shoutcast from Linux. Good luck with your DJ’ing! Hope to hear you soon! ^^

To see the Linux Shoutcast Guide Part 1 (Intro) Click Here

To see the Shoutcast Linux Guide Part 2 (the .conf file) Click Here

Linux Shoutcast Guide (Part 2 – .conf file)

In this part I am going to cover what you do with the sc_trans.conf file. If you are only ever going to stream to one server all you ever need to change past the first time is the PlaylistFile entry. For a simple list of what may need editing, have a quick look at Part 1 of this guide.  The bits in red are all you need to change. So lets get editing this file. ^^

For this you will need the following details of the shoutcast server you are broadcasting too.

Server IP
Server Port
Password
Stream Url

Got them? Ok lets roll. ^^ First off, the self explanatory bits.

PlaylistFile=example.lst

Change this to whatever the name of the playlist you want to play is called. Well cover playlists in Part 3 of this guide. For now well just leave it at example.lst.

ServerIP=myserver.com
ServerPort=8000
Password=yourpassword

All the details you should have for the server your broadcasting to. Replace what ive highlighted in red with your details.

StreamTitle=My Gay Son
StreamURL=http://mygayson.com
Genre=genres go here

Stream Title is whatever you want. Mine is DJ Naiki. Stream Url is as above a detail you should have for your shoutcast server. In Second Life its the club i work fors Land Url. For Genre that is again whatever you want it to be. Mines Urban Chill.

LogFile=sc_trans.log

When broadcasting Shoutcast will save a log into your sc_trans_40 file. This is just the name of it. If you want it to have a different name, edit this. I always just leave it as is.

Shuffle=1

Shuffle on or off. 1 is for Shuffle on, 0 is for shuffle off. I cant stand shuffle, i like my playlist to be played as is. You can just delete the 1 and leave it blank and shuffle turns off.

Bitrate=80000
SampleRate=44100
Channels=1

The quailty of the audio that your listeners hear depends directly on the the bit rate of your audio stream. The basic rule is that the higher the bit rate, the higher the quailty of the audio. 96,000 is the most common. The club i work at have 128,000.

Quality=1

Quality is self explanatoy. Enter a number 1 to 10. 1 is the best quality, 10 s the worst quality.

CrossfadeMode=1
CrossfadeLength=8000

Crossfade blends the beggining and ends of songs. Crossfade mode set to 1 is crossfade on, set to 0 is off. Again you can just delete the 1 and leave it blank and this turns it off. Crossfade length is of course the length of the crossfade. Edit as desired.

UseID3=0

Allows you to broadcast ID3 tags. Set it to 1 to turn it on, 0 is off.

Public=1

Public is wether or not you to have your station on the public listings or not. Again 1 is on, 0 or blank is off.

AIM=AIMHandle
ICQ=ICQnumber
IRC=shoutcast

Edit as desired. They just let people know your handles.  I delete them all and leave them all blank.

Part 3 will be about the Playlist file.

To see the Linux Shoutcast Guide Part 1 (Intro) Click Here

To see the Shoutcast Linux Guide Part 3 (play lists) Click Here

Linux Shoutcast Guide (Part 1 – Intro)

This aticle is a 3 part article on running broadcasting Shoutcast music from a Linux desktop to a Shoutcast server. It is aimed at newbies to walls of text and those that just cannot find a good shoutcast guide for Linux. Its also aimed at those, like me, that need Shoutcast on Second Life in Linux. ^^

Ok, so, Shoutcast on Linux kinda sucked for me. I have got it working now, but through none of the normally suggested programs. If you do not want to use what i suggest, try googling VLC, IDJC, DrakIce (and Darksnow) or Amarok.

My way of using Shoutcast is through their own ‘looks like a lot of complicated stuff’ way. Its actually however quite easy. Infact if you always broadcast to the same server, you only ever have to make play lists and change the name of the play list in the .conf file once your set up. However, on first viewing this looks complicated to the new to Linux folk, or even just those that dont use terminal and stuff much. My partner uses Mandriva and Mint so never has to touch terminal or config files so was mortified on seeing a wall of text config file when she downloaded Shoutcast. If you know your stuff with linux or know your way about config files, you might want to skip this article. Its aimed at newbies to walls of text and those that just cannot find a good shoutcast guide for Linux. ^^

To download Shoutcast, click the following link:

Click here to download Shoutcast

Extrat the file to wherever you want. You will have a folder called sc_trans_40 with a couple of files in. The only ones we need are sc_trans.conf and sc_trans_linux. For the sake of this article we are also going to use example.lst as well. The freebsd and macosx can be deleted if you like nice clean folders. ^^

Open up the sc_trans.conf file and you are presented with a wall of text. Below is the list of lines you may have to edit.

PlaylistFile=example.lst

ServerIP=myserver.com
ServerPort=8000

Password=yourpassword

StreamTitle=My Gay Son
StreamURL=http://mygayson.com
Genre=genres go here

LogFile=sc_trans.log

Shuffle=1

Bitrate=80000
SampleRate=44100
Channels=1

Quality=1

CrossfadeMode=1
CrossfadeLength=8000

UseID3=0

Public=1

AIM=AIMHandle
ICQ=ICQnumber
IRC=shoutcast

That wall of text is suddenly a lot less scary eh? ^^ My partner certainly thought so.

To see the Shoutcast Linux Guide Part 2 (the .conf file) Click Here

To see the Shoutcast Linux Guide Part 3 (play lists) Click Here


Photography on Linux page added

Ive added a new page with links to a number of photography programs and a link to a good linux photography guide website.